The Mould Guide, All About Mould and What to Do About It

What Exactly is Mould and How does it Occur?

Mould is a type of fungus that can grow nearly anywhere. It can be found in moist, dark, and damp environments like kitchens, bathrooms, basements, and even on food.

Mould spores are all around us- they float through the air from plant to plant and from animal to animal. Mould grows when it finds a food source such as wood or a wet carpet- essentially any surface with water on it for an extended period of time.

Mould can be very dangerous because some types produce toxic substances called mycotoxins, which cause problems for the lungs and immune system. Others may trigger asthma.

Mould Prevention

Mould is a living organism that can grow quickly in moist places. In most cases, it is found in areas with high humidity and low ventilation. Mould thrives on dampness and it cannot be eliminated from a home or business.

In order to prevent mould from growing, these steps should be taken:

1) Keep all areas dry and well-ventilated

2) Inspect wet areas every day for leaks

3) Do not use a humidifier

4) Keep dust levels low

5) Regularly clean your home with microfibre cloths and HEPA vacuuming.

 

Factors Contributing to Mould Growth

Moulds can be found everywhere in the environment around us. The most common mould species is Cladosporium and it prefers humid dusty environments.

One of the main factors that contribute to mould growth is high relative humidity and dampness. High humidity and dampness may come from external sources, such as the presence of a leaky roof or condensation on walls inside a building.

Mould starts to grow when there is plenty of food available, such as wood, paper, fiberboard, carpeting or insulation materials like polyester and foam rubber.

 

Types of Mould and their Effects on Humans

Mould is a type of fungi that grows on organic matter. It can be found in the home on a variety of surfaces, including wood, paper, and fabric. With some moulds being toxic to humans and pets alike.

There are three different types of mould that can grow in your home:

There are many harmful effects that come with having any type of mould in the house. These effects include allergic reactions, asthma, or chemical sensitivities. For those who already have asthma or allergies, this could cause their symptoms to worsen drastically.

 

Are You Susceptible to Mould?

Mould can cause health problems. If you are susceptible, you will likely experience the symptoms of mould exposure more quickly than someone who is not as susceptible.

Mould is a type of fungus that grows on damp surfaces. It thrives in dark, damp, and warm areas like your home. Some people are more susceptible to mould than others and can suffer from Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (CIRS) or chronic fatigue. This may lead to an array of symptoms such as fever, headaches, aches and pains, sinusitis or chest congestion.

 

Conclusion: Preventing & Caring for your Home from Moulds

In this section, we will try to discuss the prevention and care for your home from moulds.

Mould is a fungus that grows in places where there is moisture and food. Moulds release toxic substances that affect our health when we breathe in the spores or touch it. The signs of mould growth in your home may not be visible or easy to spot so it’s important to keep an eye out for the following signs.

– Water spots on walls or ceilings, which can indicate leaks or condensation on uninsulated pipes.

– Odors of mustiness, mildew, rotting plants, musty paper, wet newspapers, rotten eggs – these are common odors associated with mould growth.

– Curling of wallpaper or peeling paint – this can happen when moisture gets trapped behind the wall covering or paint, causing it to expand and create bubbles

It is always better to hire a qualified building biologist from Balanced Building Biology to complete a mould and moisture assessment of your building. They use professional equipment and know what to look for. They can also complete a mould test for laboratory analysis.

The Reality of Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (CIRS) and How It Impacts Your Immune System

Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (CIRS) is a condition that affects the body for a long time without a known cause.

People with CIRS suffer from debilitating symptoms that range from joint pain and digestive issues to more serious conditions like heart arrhythmias and cognitive impairment. They can’t work or enjoy life like they would if their bodies could heal, and we don’t know how to stop it.

Many people report getting better with proper treatment, but there is currently no cure for CIRS. If you suffer from these debilitating symptoms, you may want to consider seeing a doctor.

What is chronic inflammatory response syndrome?

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The chronic inflammatory response syndrome is an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases are ones in which the body’s immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. It was first discovered by Dr. Shoemaker, a doctor in the US. He noticed that there were some chemicals that caused this disease to occur more frequently than it would have otherwise.

Symptoms of CIRS and the Impact on the Immune System

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CIRS is one of the most common causes of autoimmune diseases. CIRS is an acronym for Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome which describes a pathological response to toxic substances that are found in mold and mycotoxins.

The immune system usually protects us against pathogens; however, when it is compromised by CIRS, it can’t do its job effectively. This will cause the immune system to attack healthy cells and tissue instead of fighting off the infection.

According to the latest data on the availability of the HLA DR genotype, it is currently looking like 1 in 4 people do not have this gene variant which makes them more vulnerable to mould infections.

 

Can Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Be Diagnosed and Treated?

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The Shoemaker Protocol is a treatment for chronic inflammatory response syndrome. It consists of a hands-on approach to treatment, which includes both physical and mental health.

The VCS test can be used to diagnose chronic inflammatory response syndrome. The VCS test is done by measuring the contrast sensitivity of an individual’s vision to figure out how well they can distinguish between low-contrast, high-contrast, and medium-contrast objects.

Given the seriousness of CIRS, it is crucial to find a functional medical practitioner who can diagnose it.

Conclusion

We found that, like many other chronic conditions, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to living with CIRS. This can be discouraging for those who want a clear end point; but getting a proper medical diagnosis they have and having an understanding of what kind of medical support to get can help CIRS patients move forward.

Understanding Mould-Related Health Conditions and How to Prevent Them

Mould is everywhere and it’s no fun at all. Mould can trigger any number of health-related conditions and leave you feeling like a shell of your former self.

Mould is very sneaky and can easily get into your home without you even realizing. Mould on the walls, on the carpet, on the furniture — it can all contribute to mould-related health conditions that will make life a living hell if left untreated.

It is quite easy to prevent mould from creeping into your home with a few simple steps. Learn how with this article written by Building Scientists / Building Biologists; experts in their field.

Introduction: What is Mould, and Why is it a Problem?

Mould is the scientific term for the microscopic fungi that grow in warm, damp places. There are many different types of moulds, and they can cause a variety of health issues in humans. Moulds in buildings are dangerous because they release mycotoxins which can lead to serious health conditions.

Mould is any species of fungus that grows in a place that has high levels of moisture or humidity.

Mould develops when there is water damage or extreme condensation in an untreated building. These mycotoxins are dangerous because they can lead to various health issues like asthma, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression and anxiety – even cancer!

If you’ve ever seen mold on bread or cheese after it has been left out for too long (or smelled it), then you know how quickly something can go bad, which is why it’s important to keep your food in the refrigerator. An existing building affected by mould or moisture can be made safe for occupancy after proper mould remediation by an IICRC mould remediation specialist.

 

How Does Exposure to Mould Cause Problems in the Human Body?

Mould exposure can lead to allergies, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS). All of these are serious health conditions that you should not take lightly.

Exposure to mould spores or mould in the home can cause allergic reactions. It is estimated that up to 27% of people who live in the US are allergic to mould spores. If you have a condition like asthma or hay fever then the risk of developing an allergy is much higher. Other symptoms associated with mould exposure are fatigue, depression, headaches, skin problems, memory loss and concentration difficulties.

Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), is caused by a combination of physical and mental disorders which make sufferers tired all the time. Sufferers may not be able to do much other than rest, causing them to miss work or school.

Mold Related Health Conditions and How to Prevent Them ​

Mould spores can be found everywhere in our environment. However, they are most common in damp environments like a water-damaged home. Mould exposure can lead to some serious health conditions like asthma, allergies, or lung infections.

With mould exposure comes the need for mould prevention. Here are some of the ways to prevent mould growth in your home:

-Maintain humidity levels at 60% or less inside your home

-Keep your house clean and dry

-Deal with leaks and water backup promptly

-Dry and dehumidify water damaged areas within 24 to 48 hours of the water damage

Reported Prevalence of Mould in Australia

Mould is a common problem in Australian homes. It affects people’s health and can lead to numerous respiratory problems. Many Australians are unaware of the risks of toxic mould in their homes, but it is imperative that they act quickly to manage or remove the mould for their own health and safety.

Houses built before 1987 are more likely to have mould, especially in wet areas such as basements, kitchens, bathrooms or laundry rooms. Homes with new roofs or air conditioning units are at risk because water leaks into the roofspace and accumulates under insulation boards leading to mould growth.

Young children are at high risk of developing respiratory issues related to toxic mould exposure so parents should be vigilant about their kids’ environment. This includes looking for dampness or changes in relative humidity which can indicate a presence of a potentially toxic substances.

Mould Exposure and Testing

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 3.1 billion people live in homes with dampness and mould. Mold exposure has been linked to respiratory and other health problems.

This paper will focus on mould exposure and testing, its prevalence in the home and the measures taken by the Australian government to tackle this issue.

Mould is a plant-like organism that thrives in moist environments such as bathroom tiles, kitchen cabinets, carpeting and wallpaper. It may not be immediately harmful but can lead to serious health issues if it is not removed from a home.

The WHO estimates that 3.1 billion people live in homes with dampness and mould; this could be due to the increase of new buildings in Australia with condensation problems or because not many people know how to deal with mould when they notice it.

Conclusion

We all know that mould is a part of life. It’s around us in the air, on surfaces, and in water. But what happens when there’s too much mould?

Mould can cause serious health issues, allergies, and respiratory problems. We should maintain a clean/dry home to minimize the chances of encountering mould. If you see any signs of excess moisture or water damage, address it quickly to prevent other health issues like asthma and lung infections. Finally, dehumidify your home to reduce moisture levels and keep it safe for everyone who lives there!

The Complete Guide to Indoor Air Quality and How it Affects Your Home

Fortunately, this guide is to help you understand how indoor air quality affects your home.

If you’re like the rest of us, your home is your sanctuary. The place where you can relax and try to forget about the hustle-and-bustle of life.

But did you know that, according to recent studies, 87% of households in the United States report experiencing at least one symptom of high indoor air pollution? That’s why it’s so important to take steps today to help improve the quality of your home environment for both you and those who live there with you. That’s why we’ve created this guide for you.

What is Indoor Air Quality?

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Indoor air quality is air quality in a building. Specifically, it is the pollutants in the air when it has been isolated from the outside world.

The quality of indoor air can vary significantly, depending on factors such as ventilation and contaminants. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) are common pollutants with high concentrations in areas like offices and homes where occupants use gas-powered devices. Formaldehyde (HCHO), which causes cancer and causes irritation to throat, nose and eyes; VOCs (volatile organic compounds) and mVOCs (molecular VOCs) which include chemicals like benzene, formaldehyde, toluene or acetone are all common pollutants indoors.

House Dust Mites and Their Role in the Development of Asthma

Allergens are substances that cause allergies, and dust mites are one of them. Dust mite allergies can cause asthma, hives, rhinitis, and eczema, but these allergens can be easily eliminated with HEPA vacuum cleaners.

Dust mites are common allergens that live in our homes. They feed on the dead skin cells we shed every day and produce fecal particles (fecal pellets). These fecal pellets can sometimes trigger allergic reactions like asthma or hives. Some people may not be sensitive to the fecal pellets at all.

HEPA vacuum cleaners can eliminate dust mites by trapping dust before it gets circulated back into the air where it would then become airborne again. HEPA filters will block 99% of particles as small as 0.3.

How to Choose The Best Air Purifier

InovaAir Air Purifier - E20 Activated Carbon H13 HEPA filter

There are many air purifiers on the market, but not all of them will suit your needs. To make sure to choose the right one for you, you need to look at the size of the room, your budget and your personal preference.

I recommend you consider three factors when choosing an air purifier: The size of the room it will be used in, whether or not it is hospital grade HEPA filter and how much money you are comfortable spending.

InovaAir’s Airclean E8 and E20 air purifiers are perfect for bedrooms and living areas. They have H13 HEPA filters and a solid 6kg activated carbon filter. They can purify a room of up to 100m2. Whole-house systems are also available.

Top 3 Tips to Improve Indoor Air

Here are some top 3 tips to improve indoor air quality, which experts recommend:

1. Open windows – every day for 15 minutes, experts recommend opening windows to let fresh air in and reduce the amount of chemicals that accumulate inside your home.

2. Air purifier – experts recommend using an air purifier to remove pollutants like mold, bacteria, and allergens from the air you breathe at home.

3. Dehumidifier to reduce relative humidity – experts recommend using a dehumidifier to reduce relative humidity because it can lead to respiratory problems like poor sleep quality and stuffy nose.

Conclusion

Good indoor air quality is important for human health. That’s why it should be a priority to care for our indoor spaces.

Some of the benefits of a healthy indoor space are:

– Better sleep,

– Less headaches and tiredness,

– Improved concentration,

– Reduced risk of catching a cold or flu.

Avoid Research! Get these Air Purifiers

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