The Mould Guide, All About Mould and What to Do About It

What Exactly is Mould and How does it Occur?

Mould is a type of fungus that can grow nearly anywhere. It can be found in moist, dark, and damp environments like kitchens, bathrooms, basements, and even on food.

Mould spores are all around us- they float through the air from plant to plant and from animal to animal. Mould grows when it finds a food source such as wood or a wet carpet- essentially any surface with water on it for an extended period of time.

Mould can be very dangerous because some types produce toxic substances called mycotoxins, which cause problems for the lungs and immune system. Others may trigger asthma.

Mould Prevention

Mould is a living organism that can grow quickly in moist places. In most cases, it is found in areas with high humidity and low ventilation. Mould thrives on dampness and it cannot be eliminated from a home or business.

In order to prevent mould from growing, these steps should be taken:

1) Keep all areas dry and well-ventilated

2) Inspect wet areas every day for leaks

3) Do not use a humidifier

4) Keep dust levels low

5) Regularly clean your home with microfibre cloths and HEPA vacuuming.

 

Factors Contributing to Mould Growth

Moulds can be found everywhere in the environment around us. The most common mould species is Cladosporium and it prefers humid dusty environments.

One of the main factors that contribute to mould growth is high relative humidity and dampness. High humidity and dampness may come from external sources, such as the presence of a leaky roof or condensation on walls inside a building.

Mould starts to grow when there is plenty of food available, such as wood, paper, fiberboard, carpeting or insulation materials like polyester and foam rubber.

 

Types of Mould and their Effects on Humans

Mould is a type of fungi that grows on organic matter. It can be found in the home on a variety of surfaces, including wood, paper, and fabric. With some moulds being toxic to humans and pets alike.

There are three different types of mould that can grow in your home:

There are many harmful effects that come with having any type of mould in the house. These effects include allergic reactions, asthma, or chemical sensitivities. For those who already have asthma or allergies, this could cause their symptoms to worsen drastically.

 

Are You Susceptible to Mould?

Mould can cause health problems. If you are susceptible, you will likely experience the symptoms of mould exposure more quickly than someone who is not as susceptible.

Mould is a type of fungus that grows on damp surfaces. It thrives in dark, damp, and warm areas like your home. Some people are more susceptible to mould than others and can suffer from Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (CIRS) or chronic fatigue. This may lead to an array of symptoms such as fever, headaches, aches and pains, sinusitis or chest congestion.

 

Conclusion: Preventing & Caring for your Home from Moulds

In this section, we will try to discuss the prevention and care for your home from moulds.

Mould is a fungus that grows in places where there is moisture and food. Moulds release toxic substances that affect our health when we breathe in the spores or touch it. The signs of mould growth in your home may not be visible or easy to spot so it’s important to keep an eye out for the following signs.

– Water spots on walls or ceilings, which can indicate leaks or condensation on uninsulated pipes.

– Odors of mustiness, mildew, rotting plants, musty paper, wet newspapers, rotten eggs – these are common odors associated with mould growth.

– Curling of wallpaper or peeling paint – this can happen when moisture gets trapped behind the wall covering or paint, causing it to expand and create bubbles

It is always better to hire a qualified building biologist from Balanced Building Biology to complete a mould and moisture assessment of your building. They use professional equipment and know what to look for. They can also complete a mould test for laboratory analysis.

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