Understanding Mould-Related Health Conditions and How to Prevent Them

Mould is everywhere and it’s no fun at all. Mould can trigger any number of health-related conditions and leave you feeling like a shell of your former self.

Mould is very sneaky and can easily get into your home without you even realizing. Mould on the walls, on the carpet, on the furniture — it can all contribute to mould-related health conditions that will make life a living hell if left untreated.

It is quite easy to prevent mould from creeping into your home with a few simple steps. Learn how with this article written by Building Scientists / Building Biologists; experts in their field.

Introduction: What is Mould, and Why is it a Problem?

Mould is the scientific term for the microscopic fungi that grow in warm, damp places. There are many different types of moulds, and they can cause a variety of health issues in humans. Moulds in buildings are dangerous because they release mycotoxins which can lead to serious health conditions.

Mould is any species of fungus that grows in a place that has high levels of moisture or humidity.

Mould develops when there is water damage or extreme condensation in an untreated building. These mycotoxins are dangerous because they can lead to various health issues like asthma, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression and anxiety – even cancer!

If you’ve ever seen mold on bread or cheese after it has been left out for too long (or smelled it), then you know how quickly something can go bad, which is why it’s important to keep your food in the refrigerator. An existing building affected by mould or moisture can be made safe for occupancy after proper mould remediation by an IICRC mould remediation specialist.

 

How Does Exposure to Mould Cause Problems in the Human Body?

Mould exposure can lead to allergies, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS). All of these are serious health conditions that you should not take lightly.

Exposure to mould spores or mould in the home can cause allergic reactions. It is estimated that up to 27% of people who live in the US are allergic to mould spores. If you have a condition like asthma or hay fever then the risk of developing an allergy is much higher. Other symptoms associated with mould exposure are fatigue, depression, headaches, skin problems, memory loss and concentration difficulties.

Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), is caused by a combination of physical and mental disorders which make sufferers tired all the time. Sufferers may not be able to do much other than rest, causing them to miss work or school.

Mold Related Health Conditions and How to Prevent Them ​

Mould spores can be found everywhere in our environment. However, they are most common in damp environments like a water-damaged home. Mould exposure can lead to some serious health conditions like asthma, allergies, or lung infections.

With mould exposure comes the need for mould prevention. Here are some of the ways to prevent mould growth in your home:

-Maintain humidity levels at 60% or less inside your home

-Keep your house clean and dry

-Deal with leaks and water backup promptly

-Dry and dehumidify water damaged areas within 24 to 48 hours of the water damage

Reported Prevalence of Mould in Australia

Mould is a common problem in Australian homes. It affects people’s health and can lead to numerous respiratory problems. Many Australians are unaware of the risks of toxic mould in their homes, but it is imperative that they act quickly to manage or remove the mould for their own health and safety.

Houses built before 1987 are more likely to have mould, especially in wet areas such as basements, kitchens, bathrooms or laundry rooms. Homes with new roofs or air conditioning units are at risk because water leaks into the roofspace and accumulates under insulation boards leading to mould growth.

Young children are at high risk of developing respiratory issues related to toxic mould exposure so parents should be vigilant about their kids’ environment. This includes looking for dampness or changes in relative humidity which can indicate a presence of a potentially toxic substances.

Mould Exposure and Testing

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 3.1 billion people live in homes with dampness and mould. Mold exposure has been linked to respiratory and other health problems.

This paper will focus on mould exposure and testing, its prevalence in the home and the measures taken by the Australian government to tackle this issue.

Mould is a plant-like organism that thrives in moist environments such as bathroom tiles, kitchen cabinets, carpeting and wallpaper. It may not be immediately harmful but can lead to serious health issues if it is not removed from a home.

The WHO estimates that 3.1 billion people live in homes with dampness and mould; this could be due to the increase of new buildings in Australia with condensation problems or because not many people know how to deal with mould when they notice it.

Conclusion

We all know that mould is a part of life. It’s around us in the air, on surfaces, and in water. But what happens when there’s too much mould?

Mould can cause serious health issues, allergies, and respiratory problems. We should maintain a clean/dry home to minimize the chances of encountering mould. If you see any signs of excess moisture or water damage, address it quickly to prevent other health issues like asthma and lung infections. Finally, dehumidify your home to reduce moisture levels and keep it safe for everyone who lives there!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>